All Projects Do Come to an End

All Projects Do Come to an End

Posted by on Saturday, December 31st, 2011  

 

By definition, a project is something that is temporary.  Ever heard the phrase “All good things must come to an end”?  They must have been talking about projects, right?  To some of you that deal with projects every day you might have just laughed a little because some projects don’t seem “good”.  We have to deal with constraints (time, cost, scope, resources, quality, and risks) and those can sometimes make our projects seem “bad” or at least add strain when certain contraints are placed on the project.  Managing those constraints can make the difference in a successful project completion.

This month we wrapped up one of our big projects.  Over the past year we have been migrating 23 sites to a new Sitecore environment, with new code, layouts, templates, etc.  We started off the project with a full-time project manager and sufficient resources.  What could possibly stand in our way?  About half way through the migrations we lost a few resources.  A resource constraint was placed on the project, but I am proud to say that the migration project ended on time and with a high quality of work.  Not to say that things went smoothly all the time, but it was all about managing our constraints appropriately.  Our deliverables met all the requirements so our stakeholders where happy, which made us happy.

It was a great way to put an end to the year.  How has constraints made a difference in your projects?  I would love to hear about the “good” and the “bad”.

Posted by on Saturday, December 31st, 2011  

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    Nov 25
    2012

    Dharmesh

    Yes, you’re right; SharePoint will only return the lasett version number. I have seen workarounds like custom code to retrieve all versions of a document, different sites for document management (like publishing site concepts, work in progress sites and published sites) or use of third party tools like the one you referenced.I think it comes down to the requirement of needing to see all versions, and the types of documents you’re interested in seeing all of. Some types of documents contain value in seeing all of the versions, some not so much. I have done a lot of work with law firms using SharePoint, and this topic comes up a lot with regard to defining their eDiscovery strategy.Send me an email if you want to discuss more.

    Reply

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